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Performing Arts Center

Movies at Main Street Landing

Movies at Main Street Landing

Main Street Landing’s weekly movie series brings great classic cinema to the Burlington area. It is a free event open to the public on a first come first served basis. We accept donations at the door to benefit a local non-profit. Movies at Main Street Landing offers the non-profit organization the platform to raise money, to receive advertising exposure, and to promote their cause.  Movies at Main Street Landing culturally enriches the Burlington community with free classic films presented weekly on our big 25 foot movie screen, with Dolby surround sound. Every Tuesday Night at 7 p.m. at the Main Street Landing Film House, Third Floor of the Lake and College Building, at Sixty Lake Street, in Burlington, Vermont. More info? Call Mariah Riggs, Director of the Performing Arts Center, 802-540-3018,or Mariah@mainstreetlanding.com.

 

Movies at Main Street Landing

January Non Profit

January Non Profit

22 sq ft 22 gross/month

Puppets in Education teaches children how to keep themselves safe and healthy and to appreciate each other’s differences. We do this through educational programs for children and adults that utilize life-sized puppets who model effective leadership and problem-solving skills and demonstrate respect, compassion and inclusion in a diverse community.

1/17- Blazing Saddles (1974)

1/17- Blazing Saddles (1974)

22 sq ft 22 gross/month

This hilarious bad-taste spoof of Westerns, co-written by the legendary Richard Pryor, features Cleavon Little as the first black sheriff of a stunned town scheduled for demolition by an encroaching railroad. Little and co-star Gene Wilder have great chemistry, and the delightful supporting cast includes Harvey Korman, Slim Pickens, and Madeline Kahn as a chanteuse modelled on Marlene Dietrich. As in Young Frankenstein (1974), Silent Movie (1976), and High Anxiety (1977), director/writer Mel Brooks gives a burlesque spin to a classic Hollywood movie genre; in his own manic, Borscht Belt way, Brooks was a central player in revising classic genres in light of Seventies values and attitudes, an effort most often associated with such directors as Robert Altman and Peter Bogdanovich. Some of this film's sequences, notably a gaseous bean dinner around a campfire, have become comedy classics.

1/24- Withnail and I (1987)

1/24- Withnail and I (1987)

19 sq ft 22 gross/month

When the British film Withnail and I was released in 1987, it wasn’t a huge hit. It took a VHS release for people to develop a taste for the movie and turn it into the cult classic that is so beloved today. The film follows two “resting” thespians, the dipsomaniac Withnail (Richard E. Grant) and I (Paul McGann), in 1969. Withnail and I visit Uncle Monty (Harry Potter’s Richard Griffiths) in the countryside for a “holiday by mistake,” one in which everything goes wrong.

First-time director Bruce Robinson—who was nominated for an Oscar two years earlier for his script for The Killing Fields—based the screenplay on his own life as a broke actor in drama school living in Camden Town, England. Beatle George Harrison produced the film through his HandMade Films, which is why Robinson was able to use The Beatles’ song “While My Guitar Gently Weeps” on the soundtrack. The film launched the careers of everyone involved, including McGann (Doctor Who) and Grant.

1/31- Fantastic Voyage (1966)

1/31- Fantastic Voyage (1966)

18 sq ft 23 gross/month

2001: A Space Odyssey took the world on a mind-bending trip to outer space, but Fantastic Voyage is the original psychedelic inner-space adventure. When a brilliant scientist falls into a coma with an inoperable blood clot in the brain, a surgical team embarks on a top-secret journey to the center of the mind in a high-tech military submarine shrunk to microbial dimensions. Stephen Boyd stars as a colorless commander sent to keep an eye on things, while Donald Pleasance is suitably twitchy as the claustrophobic medical consultant who is assisted by the always lovely Raquel Welch. The science is shaky at best, but the imaginative spectacle is marvelous: scuba-diving surgeons battle white blood cells, tap the lungs to replenish the oxygen supply, and shoot the aorta like daredevil surfers. The film took home a well-deserved Oscar for Best Visual Effects. Director Richard Fleischer, who turned Disney's 1954 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea into one of the most riveting submarine adventures of all time, creates a picture so taut with cold-war tensions and cloak-and-dagger secrecy that trifling scientific contradictions (such as, how do miniaturized humans breathe full-sized air molecules?) seem moot.

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