Movies at Main Street Landing

Main Street Landing

Movies at Main Street Landing

Main Street Landing’s weekly movie series brings great classic cinema to the Burlington area. It is a free event open to the public on a first come first served basis. We accept donations at the door to benefit a local non-profit. Movies at Main Street Landing offers the non-profit organization the platform to raise money, to receive advertising exposure, and to promote their cause.  Movies at Main Street Landing culturally enriches the Burlington community with free classic films presented weekly on our big 25 foot movie screen, with Dolby surround sound. Every Tuesday Night at 7 p.m. at the Main Street Landing Film House, Third Floor of the Lake and College Building, at Sixty Lake Street, in Burlington, Vermont. More info? Call Mariah Riggs, Director of the Performing Arts Center, 802-540-3018,or Mariah@mainstreetlanding.com.

    • In a lonely Place (1950)

    • Date: 2/9 | Starts at: 7pm

      Director: Nicholas Ray | Cast: Humphrey Bogart Gloria Grahame Carl Benton Reid

      Plot: A haunting work of stark confessionalism disguised as a taut noir thriller, In a Lonely Place -- Nicholas Ray's bleak, desperate tale of fear and self-loathing in Hollywood -- remains one of the filmmaker's greatest and most deeply resonant features. It stars Humphrey Bogart as Dixon Steele, a fading screenwriter suffering from creative burnout; hired to adapt a best-selling novel, instead of reading the book itself he asks the hat-check girl (Martha Stewart) at his favorite nightclub to simply tell him the plot. During production, Ray's real-life marriage to co-star Grahame began to crumble, and his own vulnerability and disillusionment clearly inform the picture; the brooding, bitter Steele -- a role ideally suited to Bogart's wounded romanticism -- is plainly a doppelganger for Ray himself (the site of his first Hollywood apartment is even employed as the set for Steele's home), and the film's unflinching examination of the character's disintegration makes for uniquely compelling viewing.

    • Se7en (1995)

    • Date: 2/16 | Starts at: 7pm

      Director: David Fincher | Cast: Brad Pitt Morgan Freeman Gwyneth Paltrow R. Lee Ermey Richard Roundtree

      Plot: Director David Fincher's dark, stylish thriller ranks as one of the decade's most influential box-office successes. Set in a hellish vision of a New York-like city, where it is always raining and the air crackles with impending death, the film concerns Det. William Somerset (Morgan Freeman), a homicide specialist just one week from a well-deserved retirement. Every minute of his 32 years on the job is evident in Somerset's worn, exhausted face, and his soul aches with the pain that can only come from having seen and felt far too much. But Somerset's retirement must wait for one last case, for which he is teamed with young hotshot David Mills (Brad Pitt), the fiery detective set to replace him at the end of the week. The moody photography is by Darius Khondji; the nauseatingly vivid special effects are by makeup artist Rob Bottin, best known for more fantasy-oriented work in films like The Howling (1981). 

    • Lolita (1962)

    • Date: 2/23 | Starts at: 7pm

      Director: Stanley Kubrick | Cast: James Mason Sue Lyon Peter Sellers Shelley Winters

      Plot: "How did they make a movie out of Lolita?" teased the print ads of this Stanley Kubrick production. The answer: by adding three years to the title character's age. The original Vladimir Nabokov novel caused no end of scandal by detailing the romance between a middle-aged intellectual and a 12-year-old nymphet. The affair is "cleansed" ever so slightly in the film by making Lolita a 15-year-old (portrayed by 16-year-old Sue Lyon). In adapting his novel to film, Nabokov downplayed the wicked satire and sensuality of the material, concentrating instead on the story's farcical aspects. James Mason plays professor Humbert Humbert, who while waiting to begin a teaching post in the United States rents a room from blowzy Shelley Winters. Winters immediately falls for the worldly Humbert, but he only has eyes for his landlady's nubile daughter Lolita. We are prepared for the ending because the film has been framed as a flashback; what we are not prepared for is Stanley Kubrick's adroit manipulation of our sympathies and expectations. An incredibly long film considering its subject matter, Lolita is never dull, nor does it ever stoop to the sensationalism prevalent in the film's ad campaign.

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Details

Where:
Main Street Landing Film House
Main Street Landing Performing Arts Center
60 Lake Street, Burlington, Vermont 
Map
When:
Every Tuesday night at 7PM
Contact:
Mariah Riggs
(802) 540-3018

mariah@mainstreetlanding.com